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Number of results: 42 for term(s): Research

Adult Environmental Education Programming in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area Related to Critical Natural Resource Issues | Amy Markle

Resource type: Research
Topics: Education - Natural Sciences


This study explored adult environmental education in the seven-county metropolitan area of the Twin Cities in Minnesota. Best practices, constraints and opportunities related to critical natural resource issue programming were examined. Twenty-nine respondents representing nonformal interpretive sites whose mission encompassed adult environmental education were interviewed. Two case studies showcasing exemplary programs were developed. Case studies highlight best practices in critical natural resource issue programming and reveal strategies to overcome constraints related to adult environmental education. Results reveal that adult environmental education comprised a small fraction of the overall programming offered at the study sites.

Library of Congress Subheads
1. adult education
2. nonformal environmental education
3. critical natural resource issues
4. Twin Cities Metropolitan Area

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American Museum of Natural History Learn & Teach Resources | American Museum of Natural History

Resource type: Web Site - Research - Course/Workshop - Curriculum
Topics: Natural Sciences - Earth - Anthropology


The American Museum of Natural History, located in New York, is one of the world's preeminent scientific and cultural institutions. Since its founding in 1869, the Museum has advanced its global mission to discover, interpret, and disseminate information about human cultures, the natural world, and the universe through a wide-ranging program of scientific research, education, and exhibition.

The Museum is renowned for its exhibitions and scientific collections, which serve as a field guide to the entire planet and present a panorama of the world's cultures.

The Museum offers onsite and offsite resources for educators, post-secondary students, pre K-12 grade students, adults and families. Some resources are available online, while others would require a visit to the Museum. Here are just some of the resources available through the Mueseum's Learn & Teach program:

For Educators:
  • Seminars on Science - Online Graduate Cources for Teachers
  • Workshops, Institutes and Courses
  • Summer Programs - Professional Development
  • Data Visualization Webinars
  • Curriculum

    For Students:
  • Graduate and Undergraduate Internships
  • Blended Courses and Workshops - Online and Onsite
  • YouthCaN: Youth Connecting and Networking

    For Adults and Families:
  • Data Visualization Webinars

    The Museum offers many more resources in addition to those listed above, including scientific publications, the latest news in science and research in several divisions.

    For more information, or to explore what the American Museum of Natural History has to offer, visit http://www.amnh.org/.

    Web Site: http://www.amnh.org/
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    Arbor Day Resources | National Arbor Day Foundation and MN Department of Natural Resources (DNR)

    Resource type: Guide - Course/Workshop - Research
    Topics: Forests/Trees


    Arbor Day marks the celebration of trees. This day is celebrated and recognized in all 50 states. May is Arbor Month in Minnesota. Arbor Day, April 26, marks the beginning of an entire month of celebrating trees. To help you organize your celebration, the National Arbor Day Foundation and MN Department of Natural Resources (DNR) provide a vast array of resources.

    National Arbor Day Foundation's Resources:
    Nature Explore is the Arbor Day Foundation's primary program that recognizes childhood education. Nature Explore is a collaborative program of the Arbor Day Foundation and Dimensions Educational Research Foundation, 501(c) 3 nonprofit organizations. The mission of this comprehensive, research-based initiative is to help children and families develop a profound engagement with the natural world, where nature is an integral, joyful part of children's daily learning. Nature Explore offers the following Arbor Day resources:
  • Outdoor Classroom Design Services to help create nurturing, nature-based outdoor spaces
  • Workshops & Conferences to share effective, inspiring ideas for enhancing children's learning with nature
  • Natural Outdoor Classroom Products, field-tested components that support children's interests and creativity
  • Family Resources to inspire nature connections at home
  • Sustainability Network to help programs connect and share ideas
  • Research and Field-testing as the foundation for all our programs and resources.

    We work with schools; nature centers; national forests, parks and wildlife refuges; zoos; arboretums; early childhood programs, libraries, faith-based programs, and many others.

    To view the Arbor Day Foundation's resources, go to http://www.natureexplore.org.

    MN DNR's Arbor Day Resources:
  • Guides on Tree Planting, Tree Care and Benefits of Trees
  • Arbor Day Activity Ideas
  • MN City Arbor Day Celebrations
  • Arbor Month History
  • Teacher's Guide to Arbor Month

    To view the DNR's Arbor Day resources, go to http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/arbormonth.

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    Back to School: Back Outside! How Outdoor Education and Outdoor School Time Create High Performance Students | Kevin J. Cole, National Wildlife Federation (NWF)

    Resource type: Report - Research - Guide
    Topics: Outdoor Recreation - Education


    In this report, Kevin J. Cole of the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) summarizes the available studies on the role of outdoor learning programs and outdoor play time in furthering children's overall education: improving their lifelong learning skills, prospects for career success and school test scores.

    American parents, educators and school administrators are faced with an unprecedented new educational challenge that is so broad, subtle and pervasive, that it is nearly invisible. They must wake up to the cold reality that American children are now spending an average of seven hours and 38 minutes per day (53 hours per week) indoors, using electronic media such as television and video games. Regular outdoor
    time, especially time in natural surroundings, has become just minutes per day and is verging on becoming a thing of the past.

    This "indoor childhood" trend is an immense and unnecessary drain on our children's long term physical, emotional and educational development.

    For a copy of the report, go to http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/Media-Center/Reports/Archive/2010/Back-to-School.aspx.

    Web Site: http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/Media-Center/Reports/Archive/2010/Back-to-School.aspx
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    Children & Nature Network (C&NN)'s Annotated Bibliographies of Research | Children & Nature Network (C&NN)

    Resource type: Research
    Topics: Outdoor Recreation - Health


    The Children & Nature Network (C&NN) released Volume 5 of C&NN's Annotated Bibliographies of Research. This one-of-a-kind free service is provided by C&NN as the best single source of studies relevant to the children and nature movement. Volume 5 includes 88 new studies reported from 2009 to 2011, bringing the total in Volumes 1 - 5 to more than 200.

    We review the literature, evaluate for quality and relevance, and then write brief descriptions of each individual research report or synthesis of research. Links are provided so that anyone can find and read the original documents as well. If you find this resource valuable to you, your work and the children and nature movement-consider sending a tax-deductible contribution.

    Findings include:
  • Preschool children experiencing a weekly outdoor lesson have improved self-efficacy and early literacy skills
  • Children who play more outside and watch less TV have lower BMIs
  • Children who spend more time outside are more physically active
  • Having other children that play outdoors helps minimize physical activity declines in adolescent girls
  • Children have higher physical activity levels in greenspace as compared to non-greenspace
  • Green areas on elementary school grounds support the highest level of children's moderate physical activity
  • Children living in neighborhoods where parents believe that there are good parks and sidewalks spend less time engaged in screen-based behaviors, are more physically active, and are more likely to walk or bike to and from school
  • Children living closer to parks and greenspace participate in more active sports and have higher levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity
  • Elementary school principals overwhelmingly believe recess has a positive impact on students' achievement, learning, and development
  • Forest School sessions increase children's and families' play in natural environments and provide numerous benefits
  • Direct nature experiences are important for changing environmental attitudes & behavior
  • In the past 5 years, children's media use has increased substantially
  • In three generations, there has been a significant decline in the amount of time Danish children spend in nature
  • In one generation, there has been a huge decline in Australian children's outdoor play (also UK and Norway)
  • Youth participation in outdoor activities has declined since 2006
  • Americans believe nature experiences are important for children, but face a number of barriers that limit their ability to support children's nature contact
  • 88 percent of children reported using a computer almost every day, while only 11 percent of children reported visiting a local park or natural area almost every day. (The Nature Conservancy, 2011)
  • In 1999-2002, less than 0.5 percent of U.S. adolescents met current nutrition, exercise, and screen time recommendations
  • Canadian children today are taller, heavier, larger, and weaker than in 1981
  • Children with low levels of physical activity and high levels of screen-time are almost two times as likely to be overweight


  • To read the research or download the PDF, go to http://www.childrenandnature.org/news/detail/cnn_to_release_volume_5_of_cnns_annotated_bibliographies_of_research/

    Web Site: http://www.childrenandnature.org/downloads/CNNRsrchVol_05.pdf
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    Dakota County Historical Society

    Resource type: Organization - Research - Field Trip/Tour - Learning Kit
    Topics: History - Geography - Anthropology - Multilingual/Multicultural


    A comprehensive museum system serving Dakota County as well as the Twin Cities metropolitan area and beyond, the Dakota County Historical Society (DCHS) collects, preserves, promotes and presents the history of Dakota County. For over 72 years DCHS has built a 20,000 piece collection and now operates two museums, regularly publishes new research, and provides more than 70 public programs and exhibits annually at facilities across the County.


    The Lawshe Memorial Museum at 130 3rd Avenue North in South St. Paul is the headquarters for DCHS, home to the museum's collections, and the location of a high-quality public research library. The Lawshe museum is also home to a permanent main street exhibit, several semi-permanent and temporary exhibits, and two annual exhibitions by community partners.

    DCHS also operates the LeDuc Historic Estate at 1629 Vermillion Street in Hastings, MN. The four acre Estate is listed on the national register of historic places, in large part because it is one of the most intact examples of a home built based on the design of renowned landscape architect Andrew Jackson Downing. The house itself is in the Gothic Revival style and is matched by a carriage barn and icehouse. In an unusual turn of events, the home was built by William and Mary LeDuc during the Civil War (1861-1865) despite William serving in the Union Army and Mary living in Ohio with her parents during the conflict. The LeDuc family story is told at the Estate and the prominent role William, Mary and their children played in the development of Minnesota is both remarkable and often overlooked.

    A record 73 public programs and exhibits are scheduled for 2011. This extraordinarily high level of programming is made possible by 600 members, more than 5,000 hours of work by more than 200 volunteers, and a dedicated staff of 3 full-time and ten part-time staff. These events range from 26 presentations and workshops on a variety of cultural history and natural history topics to interactive events like Over the Brink: Civil War Weekend and the Vermillion River Walking Tour. Exhibits and events are hosted at museums, three government centers, the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, and community libraries. Please see www.dakotahistory.org for more information.


    Web Site: http://www.dakotahistory.org
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    Earthwatch Research Expedition Fellowships | Earthwatch Education Program

    Resource type: Grant/Funding - Course/Workshop - Research - Teacher Training
    Topics:


    Earthwatch's mission is to engage people worldwide in scientific field research and education in order to promote the understanding and action necessary for a sustainable environment.

    Earthwatch fellowships enable critical partners to participate in research expeditions worldwide. Each year, Earthwatch's Fellowship Programs enable hundreds of students, teachers, conservation professionals and corporate employees to join expeditions at little or no out-of-pocket expense. Earthwatch Fellows are emissaries of the Earthwatch mission, sharing their experiences and new knowledge with thousands of students, teachers, and colleagues upon their return. An Earthwatch Fellowship is a powerful opportunity to make a difference for yourself, your students, your career, and for the world we share.

    Consider applying for a fellowship if you are:
  • A K-12 classroom educator
  • Passionate about teaching
  • Looking to learn more about environmental issues
  • Excited to collaborate with a team of teachers from around the country for 10-14 days over the summer
  • Committed to engaging your students and school community outside the classroom
  • Interested in how scientific research is conducted


  • To apply, complete the Educator Interest Form at http://www.earthwatch.org/aboutus/education/edopp/.

    Once you have filled out the Educator Interest Form, we'll contact you if we have grant funding for which you are eligible and direct you to the online Educator Application. If you're not eligible for any of our fellowship grants, we'll keep your form on file and notify you when we have funding for which you are eligible.

    Earthwatch receives funding on a rolling basis. Consequently, fellowships will also be awarded on a rolling basis until funding is exhausted.

    Web Site: http://www.earthwatch.org/aboutus/education/
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    Eco-Health Relationship Browser | Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    Resource type: Web Site - Research
    Topics: Environmental Health - Sustainability


    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) created this Eco-Health Relationship browser that can be used to illustrate the linkages between nature and human health. The tool shows connections between our nation's ecosystems, services they provide and the potential impact on people and communities. This tool explores over 300 peer-reviewed reports that document interactions with nature and human health.

    For more information visit http://www.epa.gov/research/healthscience/browser/index.html

    Web Site: http://www.epa.gov/research/healthscience/browser/index.html
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    Environmental Education Professional Development Needs and Priorities Study | Environmental Education and Training Partnership (EETAP)

    Resource type: Report - Research
    Topics: Leadership - Education


    Using interview, focus group and questionnaire data, the Environmental Education Professional Development Needs and Priorities Study identified 89 professional development needs for environmental educators, the top priorities for the next 5 years (2010-2015), gaps in current offerings, and work needed to advance education for environmental literacy. Of immediate need is professional development that helps environmental educators:

    • Conduct comprehensive EE programs with diverse audiences in local communities

    • Share models of what works, work together, and network

    • Address environmental sustainability, stewardship, and climate change

    • Apply research knowledge to practice about how to:


      • motivate for citizen participation, action, attitude and behavior change

      • connect others with nature

      • engage diverse audiences and partners

      • help students learn

      • instruct adults


    • Comprehend and apply basic EE fundamentals, core concepts and instructional techniques, and the Guidelines for Excellence

    • Teach and implement critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, and inquiry

    • Integrate EE into K-12; Science, Technology, Engineering & Math projects; No Child Left Behind; and state standards

    • Increase funding, leadership, administrative/executive skills, and communication skills

    • Perform needs assessments, build evaluation into program design, develop objectives, and conduct outcomes evaluation


    • Funded by EETAP - Environmental Education and Training Partnership through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

      Prepared by Principal Investigator:
      M. Lynette Fleming, Ph.D.
      Research, Evaluation & Development Services
      http://eetap.org

      To view the full report go to
      http://www.eetap.org/pages/dynamic/web.page.php?page_id=116&topology_id=1.

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      Forestinfo.org | Dovetail Partners, Inc.

      Resource type: EE Site - Curriculum - Video - Research
      Topics: Education - Forests/Trees - Resource Management - Teaching


      Forestinfo.org is your source for environmental education materials which are understandable, unbiased, accurate, and available in a wide variety of formats, including videos, Eco-links, lesson plans, teachers' tools, research references, forestry tours, and more! Forestinfo.org strives to facilitate informed decisions regarding forestry-related issues. Forestinfo.org is owned, managed, and maintained by Dovetail Partners, Inc., a non-profit environmental organization based in Minneapolis.

      In April 2010, a 21-year-old environmental non-profit named the Temperate Forest Foundation closed its doors. Through actions taken by the TFF Board, Dovetail Partners, Inc. assumed responsibility for the delivery and maintenance of their website and many of the products and educational materials that TFF created.

      In 2011, Dovetail redesigned and redeveloped the old Temperate Forest Foundation website and integrated resources that previously existed on their own environmental education website - the F.R.E.E. Network. The end result is Forestinfo.org - Dovetail's new one-stop site for environmental education resources. Materials from both the TFF website and the F.R.E.E. Network can now be found at Forestinfo.org.

      Web Site: http://www.forestinfo.org
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      How Much Outdoor Play Time Does Your Child Need? What the Experts Say | National Wildlife Federation (NWF)

      Resource type: Research
      Topics: Health - Outdoor Recreation


      Many parents are aware their kids are spending too much time indoors watching TV and playing video and computer games. A recent study by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that the average eight to eighteen year old kid is now spending an alarming 7 hours and 38 minutes of electronic screen time per day. This leaves very little time for old fashioned outdoor play, creating games with friends and learning to experience and appreciate nature.

      Parents surely know that more outdoor play time will help to balance out a child's day and offer them mental and physical health benefits but how much is enough? Here are some useful guidelines offered by the experts:

    • The Centers for Disease Control advises parents to encourage their children to have an hour per day of moderate physical activity to burn calories, tone the muscles and keep their weight under control. Outdoor play time is ideal for this.

    • The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children get enough exercise and also have an hour per day to unwind, relax and have some simple creative play time. Our kids are busy these days and getting some time for simple creative play is good for their growth, mental health and social development. What better way is there to reach this goal then to engage in outdoor play?

    • Researchers at the University of Illinois have determined that 30 minutes of time in a park setting will help children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be able to concentrate in the classroom and act more calmly and with more focus at home. Outdoor time in natural settings is not a cure for ADHD but it is good to know that there is some simple help for a problem affecting the lives of millions of U.S. children.

    • The Mayo Clinic recognizes how hard it is to find larger blocks of free time and recommends that children (and adults) who are unable to find 30 minutes to an hour of daily time for physical activity try to find some 10 minute "chunks" during the day to be active.

    • American school officials recognize that it is best for children to have 30 minutes per day of recess time and new findings indicate there are real benefits in concentration, nutrition and academics by having recess time prior to lunch. We suggest making those schoolyards greener with trees, vegetation and school gardens including NWF schoolyard wildlife habitats (http://www.nwf.org/Get-Outside/Outdoor-Activities/Garden-for-Wildlife/Schoolyard-Habitats.aspx).

    • The National Wildlife Federation's Be Out There Campaign recognizes how important it is for children to stay connected to nature and to have an appreciation for outdoor conservation and recommends that parents aim for a daily "Green Hour" (http://www.nwf.org/Get-Outside/Be-Out-There/Why-Be-Out-There/What-is-a-Green-Hour.aspx) of outdoor activity in natural settings even if they are in a backyard, a schoolyard, or a tree-lined street.

    • Cornell University found that children who spend significant amounts of time immersed in nature and the outdoors such as camping, hiking, or other nature activities in their younger years are more incline to be conservationists or at least be conservation-minded as adults.


    • Bottom line: 30 to 60 minutes of outdoor play time per day but even 10 minute "chunks" are a good idea.

      Vist NWF's Be Out There Page at http://www.nwf.org/Get-Outside/Be-Out-There/Activities.aspx for terrific outdoor time ideas for kids and families!

      For more information visit http://blog.nwf.org/wildlifepromise/2010/11/how-much-outdoor-play-time-does-your-child-need-what-the-experts-say/

      11/25/2010 - Kevin Coyle from Wildlife Promise

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      Integrating Environmental and Outdoor Education into Your Classroom | Jeff Ledermann

      Resource type: Teacher Training - Resource Person - Grant/Funding - Research
      Topics: Education - Curriculum - Environmental Studies - Outdoor Recreation


      Benefits of Environmental and Outdoor Education
      Research across the country has demonstrated that student achievement improves when receiving school instruction that uses the environment as an integrating context for learning. Studies have also shown that students scored as well or better on standardized measures in reading, math and language when integrating the environment and outdoors. This approach also has been shown to foster cooperative learning and civic responsibility (SEER, 2005, www.seer.org).

      Research has found that outdoor experiences are critical to attitudes and behaviors that protect the environment. People that participate in nature-based outdoor activities as children are more likely to have attitudes favorable toward the environment and engage in behaviors that are protective of the environment (Wells and Lekies, 2006). Additionally, experience out-of-doors builds creativity, physical competence, social skills, environmental knowledge, confidence and problem-solving (Chawla, 2006).

      Learn more about the research on the benefits of environmental and outdoor education at http://www.childrenandnature.org/research/

      Minnesota Department of Education's Project to Integrate Environmental and Outdoor Education in Minnesota Schools
      Recognizing that students are increasingly disconnected from nature, the 2010 Minnesota Legislature appropriated $300,000 from the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund as recommended by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources to the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE) to coordinate a project to train and support the efforts of schools and teachers to integrate environmental and outdoor education (EOE) into the instruction of academic standards. Professional development and grants of up to $8,500 were provided to six pilot schools to support 50 teachers and administrators in their use of the environment and outdoors as a context for student learning, which resulted in engaging over 1,000 additional students in EOE on a regular basis during the 2011-13 school years.

      The MDE project, which was completed in June of 2013, also tested and evaluated student achievement and several other promising activities during the project. These promising activities included teacher training, mini-grants, community partnerships, children and nature connections, green school programs, connections with MDE staff, school administrative support, and a national EOE program model. These activities (link to promising activities section) and a comprehensive evaluation of the project's impact on students and teachers by Dr. Julie Ernst, University of Minnesota-Duluth, are described in detail in the report (link to evaluation section).

      Learn more about the project by downloading the final report at http://www.seek.state.mn.us/publications/integrating_eoe.pdf

      Pilot Schools
      The following six schools participated in the MDE project. A description of their project and results from their participation are highlighted in the report. The case studies provide good ideas of how other schools can implement similar programs. (link to the part of the pdf that describes each school)

    • Concordia Creative Learning Academy, St. Paul
    • Kennedy Community School, St. Joseph
    • River's Edge Academy, St. Paul
    • Rockford Middle School, Rockford
    • Simley High School ALC, Inver Grove Heights
    • Waconia Public Schools, Waconia


    • Environmental and Outdoor Education (EOE) Model Lessons


      Green Ribbon Schools Program
      During the MDE project, the coordinator developed and implemented Minnesota's participation in the first two years of the U.S. Department of Education's Green Ribbon Schools Program. The program recognizes schools across the country for their exemplary efforts to reduce environmental impact and costs, promote better health, and ensure effective environmental education. Minnesota led the nation with the most applicants in 2013 and seven Minnesota schools and districts were among 156 schools that have received the national award to date. Awards are announced on Earth Day each year. Case studies of Minnesota's Green Ribbon Schools honorees are also in the report and provide lots of examples of what schools can do to become more green. (Links to 2012 National Honorees and 2013 National Honorees).

      Funding for the MDE project was provided by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund as recommended by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources (LCCMR). The Trust Fund is a permanent fund constitutionally established by the citizens of Minnesota to assist in the protection, conservation, preservation, and enhancement of the state's air, water, land, fish, wildlife, and other natural resources.

      Currently 40 percent of net Minnesota State Lottery proceeds are dedicated to building the Trust Fund and ensuring future benefits for Minnesota's environment and natural resources.


      Contact Information:

      Jeff Ledermann
      Environmental and Outdoor Education Project Coordinator
      Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
      520 Lafayette Rd N
      St. Paul, MN 55155
      651-757-2520
      jeff.ledermann@state.mn.us

      Beth Aune, Director, Academic Standards and Instructional Effectiveness
      Minnesota Department of Education
      1500 Highway 36 West
      Roseville, MN 55113-4266
      651-582-8200
      http://education.state.mn.us

      Additional Resources

      The Children & Nature Network (C&NN) (http://www.childrenandnature.org/research/) was created to encourage and support the people and organizations working nationally and internationally to reconnect children with nature. The network provides a critical link between researchers and individuals, educators and organizations dedicated to children's health and well-being.

      National Wildlife Federation (http://www.nwf.org/What-We-Do/Kids-and-Nature/Educators.aspx) works to connect children and youth with nature by providing educators with easy-to-implement, trusted curriculum and activities that help inspire the next generation of environmental stewards. They work with educators to get kids learning outdoors and help parents find new ways to engage their children outside.

      The Environmental Literacy Scope and Sequence (http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_c.cfm) (March 2002) provides a systems approach to environmental education that can focus the efforts of teachers and deliverers of EE to unify their many independent efforts to achieve the goal of environmental literacy. Because the Scope and Sequence is based on both state and national standards, it enables environmental education deliverers to build, adapt or integrate curriculum and assessments that are most appropriate for their particular grade level or audience.

      Minnesota Association for Environmental Education (http://www.minnesotaee.org/) serves environmental education professionals, students, K-12 educators, and supporters of EE in Minnesota through coordinating an annual conference, acknowledging successful EE programs and professionals, supporting legislation that advances EE at the state and federal level, and sharing resources among our members.

      Minnesota Naturalists' Association (http://www.mnnaturalists.org/) exists to advance natural and cultural resource interpretation for the purpose of fostering wise stewardship of all resources. It is a non-profit organization of professional environmental educators, park rangers, naturalists, interpreters and volunteers throughout the state of Minnesota and beyond.

      Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (www.mndnr.gov/education) works with citizens to conserve and manage the state's natural resources. It offers teacher trainings, outdoor classroom development assistance, workshops, safety-education classes, and naturalist-led programs at state parks.

      Web Site: http://www.seek.state.mn.us/classrm_j.cfm
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      KinderNature | Iowa Association for the Education of the Young Child

      Resource type: Web Site - Curriculum - Research
      Topics: Environmental Education - Outdoor Education


      KinderNature is a website that was created to help early childcare educators, care givers, and parents incorporate nature in their curriculum's and lives. All the activities were reviewed for age appropriateness and the multiple intelligences. Representatives from the Iowa Association for the Education of the Young Child, childcare providers, preschool educators, and kindergarten educators made up our advisory team.

      KinderNature's long-term goal is to have a website targeting preschool teachers and child care staff to assist in learning, developing, and implementing a well-balanced environmental education (EE) preschool program. The intent is for childcare providers to have developmentally appropriate programs which incorporate a variety of learning styles and stimulate within the child an excitement for learning. Environmental preschool programs can spark an environmental awareness and lay a solid foundation for the school-age environmental education building blocks that result in adults having the ability to make sound environmental decisions.

      The website offers activities for your classroom, ideas for snacks, games, adult-child combined activities, book reviews, research articles, educational aids and more.

      KinderNature is a service of the Story County Conservation Board and a REAP-CEP grant from the Iowa DNR

      For more information visit http://kindernature.org/

      Web Site: http://kindernature.org/
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      Lake Superior Binational Forum's Mining Website | Lake Superior Binational Forum

      Resource type: Web Site - Research
      Topics: Mining - Land


      The Lake Superior Binational Forum offers this section of its web site about mining that allows visitors to have easy access to many facets of mining impacts in the Lake Superior basin. The portal provides links to resources that offer diverse perspectives about mining activities including socio-economic and environmental impacts. We also have links to mining corporations, citizens' groups, tribal responses, regulatory agencies, historical information sites, photographs, experts' PowerPoint presentations at conferences, books, news, and many other resources.

      The Forum offers this as a source of information that reflects many perspectives expressed in a community where a mine is operated or proposed. The links included are meant to offer information that can help communities make well-informed choices for their future. Inclusion in this database does not necessarily mean the Forum overtly supports any one mine, position, perspective, or resource.

      The sections of the website are:
    • Mining Homepage
    • Mining in Minnesota
    • Mining in Michigan
    • Mining in Wisconsin
    • Mining in Ontario



    • The Forum welcomes your comments and suggestions for additional resources to post in this mining section -- simply use our online Speak Out Form to submit your thoughts.

      "This website offers a wide range of information representing diverse stakeholders' perspectives about mining impacts," said Bruce Lindgren, U.S. Forum co-chair. "We hope people from many communities of interest and perspectives will use the site to get solid information about potential mining impacts in order to make well-informed decisions. The Forum will use this portal to assemble, study, and share information on the cumulative impacts of mines on the Lake Superior ecosystem."

      The Forum received Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support the development of this website.

      For more information visit http://www.superiorforum.org/mining

      The Lake Superior Binational Program represents a partnership of federal, state, provincial, and First Nations/tribal governments that work together and with citizens to ensure the protection of the Lake Superior basin ecosystem. The Lake Superior Binational Forum is a citizen stakeholder group of Americans and Canadians who work together to provide input to governments about these efforts and to educate basin residents about ways to protect and restore the lake basin's natural environment.

      Web Site: http://www.superiorforum.org/mining
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      Live Owl Programs | Staff

      Resource type: Program - Speaker - Field Trip/Tour - Research
      Topics: Wildlife - Animals - Birds


      We offer a wide variety of owl programs to meet your needs. We have programs geared toward pre-K, elementary school, high school, adult, mixed audiences, and advanced Road Scholar and Audubon. Program themes include owl adaptations, human/owl interactions, vocalizations, behavior, and identification.

      All indoor programs include a visit from Alice the Great Horned Owl and can be conducted on or off site.

      Please call to discuss details.

      Web Site: http://www.houstonmn.com/Houstonmn/Program_Brochure.html
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      Minnesota EE Research: Master's and Doctoral Research

      Resource type: Research - Higher Education
      Topics: Research - Environmental Education - Education - Human Communities


      Graduate research in environmental education is an excellent, generally unpublished resource. Through a grant with the University of Minnesota, Duluth's Center for Environmental Education the environmental education Master's and Doctoral research from 1992 through 2007 was collected from Minnesota colleges and universities.

      Educators may access this research by selecting key words, title, author, institution, Library of Congress subheadings, and more.

      SEEK's EE Research section was developed by grant funds from the Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance, Boulder Lake Environmental Learning Center, U.S. EPA Region 5 Environmental Education Program, and Center for Environmental Education (University of Minnesota-Duluth).

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      Minnesota Green Schools Coalition

      Resource type: Web Site - Research - Curriculum
      Topics: Environmental Health - Energy - Health - Sustainable Development


      The Minnesota Green Schools Coalition brings together the state's strongest advocates for our children to create a Minnesota infrastructure of green schools - healthy, high performance schools that are conducive to learning while saving energy, resources and money.

      Through regular discussions on topics including new school construction, critical retrofits of existing facilities, green cleaning, metrics-based programs to track energy consumption and experiential learning opportunities for teachers and students, the Coalition is working to shape the classroom of the future and fundamentally change the way Minnesota students learn about the world around them.

      Resources
      The website includes recommended Green Schools resources in the following categories:
    • Case Study
    • Research
    • Building Performance - tools and calculators
    • Curriculum
    • Facility- New Design and Construction
    • Facility- Existing Operations, Maintenance and Policies
    • Financing and Technical Assistance
    • Health and Nutrition
    • Energy
    • Professional Development
    • Additional Resources


    • Participating Organizations
      Membership is free to any organization or school who is committed to advancing green schools in Minnesota. We ask that participating organizations commit to sharing the MN Green Schools website and key initiatives with your organization by placing a link to the coalition website on your organization's website.

      For more information visit http://mngreenschools.org


      Web Site: http://mngreenschools.org
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      Minnesota State Plans for Environmental Education

      Resource type: Research
      Topics: Education


      For a field that is still considered to be in its infancy, environmental education has a long history in Minnesota. Minnesota has developed four formal state plans for environmental education since 1972.

      Minnesota's first EE plan (1972)

      In 1971, by executive order, Gov. Wendell Anderson established the Minnesota Environmental Education Council. This group conducted a study that resulted in the first Minnesota state plan for environmental education published in 1972. The state plan was written to offer guidance and direction for educators, the EE community and government as they work towards the state's environmental education goals.

      A GreenPrint for Minnesota: State Plan for Environmental Education (1993)

      After seeking input from nearly 1500 people, the Environmental Education Advisory Board, with staff of the Office of Environmental Education, published the second state plan in 1993: A GreenPrint for Minnesota: State Plan for Environmental Education.

      The GreenPrint laid out policy, goals, strategies and recommendations for Minnesota environmental education. For the state to work comprehensively towards those goals, three priority outcomes were identified:
      1. Establish a central environmental education clearinghouse
      2. Gather higher education institutions to coordinate teacher education for environmental education
      3. Offer environmental education training for government officials.
      The efforts resulted in the following.
      • The SEEK web site (http://www.seek.state.mn.us), Sharing Environmental Education Knowledge, was created to serve as the online clearinghouse for environmental education in Minnesota.
      • The Teacher Preparation Project (http://www.seek.state.mn.us/compact2.cfm?ItemId=6) brought together universities around the state to work together on consistent teacher education for the environment.
      • No statewide environmental education training occurred for government officials.

      GreenPrint_2A GreenPrint for Minnesota, Second Edition (2000)

      pdf_800KbA GreenPrint for Minnesota, Second Edition (800Kb)

      In 1999, staff at the Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance, under the guidance of the Environmental Education Advisory Board (EEAB) began collecting input from the Minnesota environmental education community for the development of the next state plan. Staff and board members worked to update the GreenPrint, conducting regional and audience-based focus groups and a statewide EE survey. Input centered on the progress made since the original GreenPrint and the priorities and strategies that had emerged since then.

      Seven statewide priorities emerged as outcomes to help Minnesotans reach the state's EE goals (Minn. Stat. 115A.073).
      1. Enhanced partnerships and coordination between EE providers
      2. Designated funding for EE at the local level
      3. Focus on out-of-classroom EE programs for K-12 students
      4. More support for training of environmental educators
      5. Better educator access to EE information and resources
      6. Increased education regarding responsible environmental choices
      7. Implementation of EE assessment tools.

      GreenPrint_3A GreenPrint for Minnesota: State Plan for Environmental Education, Third Edition (2008)

      pdf_2.5MbA GreenPrint for Minnesota, Third Edition (2.5Mb)

      The most recent GreenPrint is a ten-year plan running through 2018. Its focus is offering guidance to those helping Minnesota citizens achieve the state goals for environmental education (Minn. Stat. 115A.073) and ultimately attain environmental literacy-the understanding of natural and social systems and their interactions. GreenPrint, third edition continues the tradition of furthering both individual program and statewide EE efforts.

      The development of the current GreenPrint was conducted by staff of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency under the guidance of the Environmental Education Advisory Board. Input was sought from the environmental education community and interested individuals across Minnesota through six public input sessions, multiple email listservs and an online survey on the SEEK web site. Special attention was given to identifying leading challenges in environmental education.

      To address these main challenges, four outcomes, listed in priority order, were developed for the EE community to work toward over the next 10 years.
      1. Minnesotans have the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to make individual and collective lifestyle choices that support a sustainable environment.
      2. Environmental education in Minnesota is of the highest quality and is ensured through the development of standards and common definitions.
      3. Minnesota academic standards include benchmarks from the Minnesota Environmental Literacy Scope and Sequence (http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_c.cfm) across all disciplines and grade levels
      4. Minnesota has a dedicated sustainable funding mechanism for environmental education of all ages and audiences.


      Web Site: http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_k.cfm
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      Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge Resource Center

      Resource type: Book/Magazine - DVD - Research - Slides
      Topics: Habitat - Wildlife - Education - Resource Management


      Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge is one of a handful of urban refuges nationwide and reflects the commitment of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop an informed and involved citizenry that will support fish and wildlife conservation through environmental education, scientific research, and recreation. In the heart of the Twin Cities metro area, the Resource Center at Minnesota Valley provides professional assistance and accessible workspace in a scenic bluff-top location.

      The Resource Center collection reflects the management of Minnesota Valley NWR, the National Wildlife Refuge system, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service commitment to environmental education. Resources include books and periodicals, videos and photographs, displays and educational trunks, environmental education curriculum, and management documents. Services are offered at no charge to regional personnel and partners, educators, and the public during regular visitor hours.


      Web Site: http://www.fws.gov/midwest/MinnesotaValley/
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      Minnesota Waste Wise | Staff

      Resource type: Web Site - Guide - Research - Resource Person
      Topics: Waste Prevention - Waste Management - Recycling - Business


      Minnesota Waste Wise (MWW) is a private, nonprofit, member-supported program that helps Minnesota businesses reduce waste and save money. MWW is a 501(c) 3 organization, affiliated with the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce.

      MWW provides educational resources on waste reduction and recycling to the Minnesota business community. In addition, MWW performs on-site waste assessments, helping businesses discover new ways to reduce waste and save money. This annual service is free to all members and is a great way to start or enhance a waste reduction program. Every year, MWW members divert more than 700 million pounds of waste from landfills and save an estimated $2.5 million in waste associated costs.

      MWW also manages the "It's in the Bag" program, a Twin-Cities based plastic bag recycling program. The "It's in the Bag" program is a collaborative effort of both public and private industry. Consumers may deposit clean, dry, empty plastic bags in specially-designed "It's in the Bag" collection bins found at collection points throughout the metropolitan area.


      Web Site: http://www.mnwastewise.org
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      Monarch Lab

      Resource type: Organization - Curriculum - Course/Workshop - Research
      Topics: Environmental Sciences - General Ecology


      The Monarch Lab aims to promote and facilitate science inquiry-based education and citizen science through original curricula, professional development, web-based resources and research opportunities. We use monarchs and other insects as focal organisms in citizen science, inquiry-based teacher workshops and conduct an annual Insect Fair to spotlight student research. The monarch butterfly serves as an excellent tool to get students, and the public, excited about science, inquiry and conservation.

      Programs we offer:
    • Monarchs in the Classroom (http://www.monarchlab.org/mitc/), which provides curricula, training and resources to educators who use monarchs and monarch habitats as sites for education.
    • Schoolyard Ecology Exploration (http://www.monarchlab.org/see/), which provides curricula, garden grants, training and resources to utilize schoolyards and nearby natural resources as sites for education.
    • Monarch Larva Monitoring Project (www.mlmp.org), has been a citizen science program since 1996. Volunteer scientists collect data on the abundance and location of monarchs according to the prescribed protocols of the project.


    • The Monarch Lab is a program of the University of Minnesota Extension and the University of Minnesota Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology.


      Web Site: www.monarchlab.org
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      Monarch Larva Monitoring Project | Karen Oberhauser

      Resource type: Program - Research - Web Site
      Topics: Conservation - General Ecology - Environmental Sciences - Wildlife


      The Monarch Larva Monitoring Project (MLMP) is a citizen science project involving volunteers from across the United States and Canada in monarch research. It was developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota to collect long-term data on larval monarch populations and milkweed habitat. The overarching goal of the project is to better understand how and why monarch populations vary in time and space, with a focus on monarch distribution and abundance during the breeding season in North America.

      As an MLMP volunteer, your contributions will aid in conserving monarchs and their threatened migratory phenomenon, and advance our understanding of butterfly ecology in general.

      For more Information and to Sign-Up to Monitor visit www.mlmp.org


      Web Site: www.mlmp.org
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      National Environmental Literacy Assessment, Phase Two | Bill McBeth, University of Wisconsin-Platteville, Principal Investigator

      Resource type: Report - Research
      Topics: Education - Research


      National Environmental Literacy Assessment, Phase Two: Measuring the Effectiveness of North American Environmental Education Programs with Respect to the Parameters of Environmental Literacy

      Prepared by: Bill McBeth, University of Wisconsin - Platteville, Principal Investigator

      February 7, 2011

      Introduction to Report
      This report is the culmination of Phase Two of the National Environmental Literacy Assessment (NELA) project. Funding was provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the project was administered by the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE). Key partners included researchers from the University of Wisconsin - Platteville, the Center for Instruction, Staff Development and Evaluation in Illinois, and the Florida Institute of Technology.

      In their focus on environmental literacy assessment, the NELA Research Team developed a multi-phased study, with the first phase designed to identify baseline levels of environmental literacy among sixth- and eighth-grade students in randomly selected U.S. schools with middle grades. The intent of the second phase of this research was to utilize the results of the baseline measures of environmental literacy in a comparative study.

      Thus, this Phase Two research sought to answer two research questions. The first was to determine the level of environmental literacy of sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students across the U.S., who participate in exemplary environmental education programs at their schools, on each of the following variables: ecological knowledge: verbal commitment; actual commitment; environmental sensitivity; general environmental feelings; environmental issue and action skills. The second was to determine how the level of environmental literacy of students in these programs compared to the Phase One baseline level of environmental literacy of sixth- and eighth-grade students across the U.S.

      To view this full report, please visit http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/outreach/reports/NELA_Phase_Two_Report_020711.pdf.

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      Progress on the Environmental Education Outcomes in Minnesota since 2008 | A GreenPrint for Minnesota, third edition

      Resource type: Research
      Topics: Education


      In A GreenPrint for Minnesota: State plan for environmental education, third edition (2008), four outcomes were developed to help the state's environmental education community target their efforts over the course of the ten-year plan.
      1. Minnesotans have the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to make individual and collective lifestyle choices that support a sustainable environment.
      2. Environmental education in Minnesota is of the highest quality and is ensured through the development of standards and common definitions.
      3. Minnesota academic standards include benchmarks from the Minnesota Environmental Literacy Scope and Sequence across all disciplines and grade levels.
      4. Minnesota has a dedicated sustainable funding mechanism for environmental education of all ages and audiences.


      To keep a running history of what progress has been made on these four outcomes, users of the GreenPrint are asked to submit a brief summary of work toward one or more of these outcomes.

      Although many wonderful programs are happening around the state, you are asked to submit only those efforts that have, or can have, a broad reach in achieving one of the four outcomes above.

      To submit an effort, please provide the following information:

      1. The outcome the activity/program/effort addresses:
      2. Name of activity/program/effort (if applicable):
      3. Date(s) of activity/program/effort:
      4. Explanation or summary of the effort and how it furthers progress of the outcome
      5. Targeted audience group(s)
      6. Geographic location (if applicable)
      7. Sponsor, group or individual involved in the activity/program/effort
      8. Links (if applicable) to your activity/program/effort:
      9. Contact person's email and phone number
      10. SEEK Partner name (if applicable)



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      Project Get Outdoors: A Guide for Moving Forward | Megan Hoye, University of Minnesota Graduate Student

      Resource type: Research - Report
      Topics: Environmental Education - Outdoor Education - Outdoor Recreation


      This reports details a nation-wide review of after school nature programs, providing a ranking of the most successful programs and their strengths. The report was funded by the University of Minnesota Regional Sustainable Development Partnership for SE Minnesota to assist Project Get Outdoors, Inc. in identifying program strengths and challenges to consider as they develop a strategic action plan for Project GO statewide expansion.

      Web Site: http://www.mnprojectgo.com/Resources/MovingForward.pdf
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      Report: The Dirt on Dirt: How Getting Dirty Outdoors Benefits Kids | National Wildlife Federation's (NWF) Be Out There campaign

      Resource type: Report - Research - Guide
      Topics: Outdoor Recreation - Health - Culture


      While many times getting our hands dirty is frowned upon, Be Out There has some new facts and figures that may have you throwing your kids into the nearest mud puddle.

      In our report The Dirt on Dirt: How Getting Dirty Outdoors Benefits Kids, we reveal how getting down and dirty in the great outdoors -- far from being a bad thing -- helps children lead happier, healthier lives.

      But here's the dirty little secret:
      Dirt and germs can actually be good for kids. The things small children want to do outside, like building mud castles, splashing around in puddles and rolling down hills until their clothes are irreparably grass-stained -- all those things that make mothers reach for hand sanitizer and laundry detergent -- may, in fact, be a grubby little prescription for health and happiness.

      Unfortunately, boys and girls today spend the better part of their time, seven hours per day on average (Rideout, 2010), indoors, in the sterile company of technology, rather than following their in-born impulses to explore the natural world with their senses. This indoor childhood is damaging to kids. In fact, in the last twenty years as kids spent less and less time outside, childhood obesity rates more than doubled (CDC, 2008), the United States became the largest consumer of ADHD medications in the world (Sax, 2000), 7.6 million U.S. children are vitamin D deficient (Kumar, 2000), and the use of antidepressants in pediatric patients rose sharply (Delate, 2004).

      When kids do leave the house, a growing body of research suggests the exact things we do in the name of protecting them from dirt and germs, such as not letting them get too messy and frequently using hand sanitizers and antibacterial products, can inhibit their mental and physical health and resilience.

      For the Health of it
      When we let our kids play in dirt we're not only allowing them to explore the wonders around them, we are also exposing them to healthy bacteria, parasites, and viruses that will inevitably create a much stronger immune system! Many kids who live in an ultraclean environment have a greater chance of suffering from allergies, asthma, and other autoimmune diseases that we would otherwise be protected from through the simple pleasure of playing with some nice common dirt.

      The Joy of Dirt
      Studies have shown that simply having contact with dirt, whether it's through gardening, digging holes, or making pies out of mud, can significantly improve a child's mood and reduce their anxiety and stress. With antidepressant use in kids on the rise, an increasing number of experts are recognizing the role of nature in enhancing kids' mental health. Dirt can even improve classroom performance. It's easy to see the effect when you watch children play outside.

      To Download the Full Report (pdf), go to http://www.nwf.org/Be-Out-There/Why-Be-Out-There/Dirt-is-Great.aspx.

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      Research: Students learn environmental stewardship, improve science scores | Kathryn Karsh, Edward Bush, Janice Hinson and Pamela Blanchard.

      Resource type: Research
      Topics: Research - Education


      Some scholars claim that including environmental education into the school curriculum improves student tests in science and other subject areas. To test this hypothesis, researchers used pre/post-tests of 463 students in 4 schools in Louisiana. Students received horticulture lessons and grew plants for a restoration project on coastal areas. Participants scored higher in science tests after the first and second years of instruction than students in a control group. In addition, "Long and short-term memory test indicated individual higher scores for the students who were instructed in this program compared to the control students."

      SOURCE:
      Kathryn Karsh, Edward Bush, Janice Hinson and Pamela Blanchard. Integrating Horticulture Biology and Environmental Coastal Issues into the Middle School Science Curriculum. HortTechnology, 19: 813-817 (2009).

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091211093641.htm

      To read the entire thesis, go to: http://etd.lsu.edu/docs/available/etd-03282005-124326/unrestricted/Karsh_thesis.pdf

      For more information visit http://eelinked.naaee.net/n/eeresearch/posts/Students-learn-environmental-stewardship-improve-science-scores


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      Shore Land Management: Erosion | Pelican River Watershed District

      Resource type: DVD - Exhibit/Display - Research - Speaker
      Topics: Environmental Studies - Lake - Landscape - Stewardship


      Participants will be able to:
      -Identify erosion and the need for erosion control measures
      -Learn how eroded soil affects lake and water systems
      -Learn different types of erosion control measures and their benefits

      **********

      ENVIRONMENTAL LITERACY SCOPE AND SEQUENCE
      SYSTEM CONCEPT(S) TO BE ADDRESSED:
      cause and effect
      geomorphism
      patterns

      SYSTEM BENCHMARK(S) TO BE ADDRESSED FOR GRADES 6-8, 9-12(adult):
      Grades 6-8
      C-2 The output from a social or natural system can become the input to other parts of social and natural systems.
      C-3 Social and natural systems are connected to each other and to other larger or smaller systems.

      Grades 9-12 (adult)
      D-2 Interaction between social and natural systems is defined by their boundaries, relation to other systems, and expected inputs and outputs.
      D-3 Feedback of output from some parts of a managed social or natural system can be used to bring it closer to desired results.

      **********

      MINNESOTA ACADEMIC STANDARDS
      MINNESOTA SCIENCE STANDARD(S) TO BE ADDRESSED:
      7.IV.C.1 - The student will provide examples of the potentially irreversible effects of human activity on ecosystems.

      7.IV.C.4 - The student will explain the factors that affect the number and types of organisms an ecosystem can support, including available resources, abiotic and biotic factors and disease.

      8.III.A.1 - The student will identify and research an environmental issue and evaluate its impact.

      8.III.A.2 - The student will describe how features on the Earth's surface are created and constantly changing through a combination of slow and rapid processes of weathering, erosion, sediment deposition, landslides, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.

      9-12.IV.C.4 - The student will predict and analyze how a change in an ecosystem, resulting from natural causes, changes in climate, human activity or introduction of invasive species, can affect both the number of organisms in a population and the biodiversity of species in the ecosystem.

      9-12.IV.F.1 - The student will explain the relationship between abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem in terms of the cycle of water, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen.

      **********
      NI7
      NI8
      NI9
      NI10
      NI11
      NI12

      Posted by Natural Innovations




      Web Site: http://www.prwd.org
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      Shoreland Management: Natural Shoreline | Pelican River Watershed District

      Resource type: DVD - Research - Resource Person - Speaker
      Topics: Environmental Studies - Lake - Land - Landscape


      After completing this activity, participants will be able to:
      -Understand the difference between native and non-native shorelines and the benefits of native vegetation
      -Understand the different methods of erosion control

      **********

      ENVIRONMENTAL LITERACY SCOPE AND SEQUENCE
      SYSTEM CONCEPT(S) TO BE ADDRESSED:
      cause and effect
      community
      geomorphism
      population

      SYSTEM BENCHMARK(S) TO BE ADDRESSED FOR GRADES 9-12(adlt):
      D-2 Interaction between social and natural systems is defined by their boundaries, relation to other systems, and expected inputs and outputs.
      D-4 It is not always possible to predict accurately the result of changing some part or connection between social and natural systems.

      **********

      MINNESOTA ACADEMIC STANDARDS
      MINNESOTA SCIENCE STANDARD(S) TO BE ADDRESSED:
      7.IV.C.1 - The student will provide examples of potentially irreversible effects of human activity on ecosystems.

      8.I.B.1 - The student will know that scientific investigations involve the common elements of systematic observations, the careful collection of relevant evidence, logical reasoning and innovation in developing hypotheses and explanations.

      9-12.III.A.1 - The student will identify and research an environmental issue and evaluate its impact.

      ***********
      NI7
      NI8
      NI9

      Posted by Natural Innovations

      Web Site: http://www.prwd.org
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      Social Norms: An Underestimated and Underemployed Lever for Managing Climate Change | Vladas Griskevicius, University of Minnesota, et al.

      Resource type: Research - Report
      Topics: Communications - Human Communities - Climatology


      It is widely recognized that communications that make social norms salient can be effective in influencing behavior. What is surprising, given the strength of the evidence, is how little people are aware of the extent to which social norms affect their own behavior. Consequently, this low-cost persuasion strategy is considerably underutilized to promote behaviors to help reduce climate change. In this paper we review recent field experiments that harness the power of social norms to influence pro-environmental behavior. We also elucidate the circumstances under which providing normative information is optimal, as well as circumstances under which such information can backfire to produce the opposite of what a communicator intends.

      Web Site: http://195.37.26.249/ijsc/docs/artikel/03/3_03_IJSC_Research_Griskevicius.pdf
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      State of the World 2010: Transforming Cultures From Consumerism to Sustainability | Worldwatch Institute

      Resource type: Report - Research
      Topics: Sustainability


      For society to thrive long into the future, we must move beyond our unsustainable consumer culture to one that respects environmental realities. In State of the World 2010, the Worldwatch Institute's award-winning research team reveals not only how human societies can make this shift but also how people around the world have already started to nurture a new culture of sustainability. Chapters present innovative solutions to global environmental problems, focusing on institutions that are the principal engineers of culture, such as governments, the media, and religious organizations. Written in clear, concise language, with easy-to-read charts and tables, State of the World presents a view of our changing world that we, and our leaders, cannot afford to ignore.

      State of the World 2010: Transforming Cultures: From Consumerism to Sustainability, Discussion Guide
      This 9-page discussion guide is a companion to the report and contains 34 questions. You can pick and choose freely among these questions taking into consideration which questions, articles, and sections will be most useful to your group.

      About the State of the World Series
      Worldwatch's flagship publication, State of the World, has educated a broad audience of students, journalists, policymakers, and concerned citizens about trends in sustainable development for a quarter century. The book has been published in 36 languages, and over the years it has authoritatively assessed issues ranging from population, energy, and agriculture to materials use, health, and trade policy. Topics are covered from a global perspective, with an emphasis on innovation and problem-solving. State of the World is recognized as a classic of environmental literature, having attracted luminaries from Kofi Annan to Mikhail Gorbachev to write forewords for the book. News media, policymakers, and NGOs worldwide cite the book for its cutting-edge analysis, reliability, and careful documentation of its arguments, all marshaled to speed the global transition to a sustainable world.

      For more information or to order a copy of this pubication visit http://www.worldwatch.org/bookstore/publication/state-world-2010-transforming-cultures

      Web Site: http://www.worldwatch.org/bookstore/publication/state-world-2010-transforming-cultures
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      Teachers at Sea Program | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

      Resource type: Grant/Funding - Field Trip/Tour - Research
      Topics: Water - Education - Research


      Are you an educator interested in gaining first-hand research experience on an ocean research ship? Explore the opportunities offered by the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Teacher at Sea program.

      The mission of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Teacher at Sea program is to give teachers a clearer insight into our ocean planet, a greater understanding of maritime work and studies, and to increase the environmental literacy by fostering an interdisciplinary research experience.

      The program provides a unique environment for learning and teaching by sending kindergarten through college-level teachers to work under the tutelage of scientists and crew at sea aboard NOAA research and survey ships. Then, armed with new understanding and experience, teachers bring this knowledge back to their classrooms. Participants can expect to be at sea anywhere from one week to one month, with the average cruise lasting 12-14 days.

      All necessary travel costs are paid for by the NOAA Teacher at Sea Program. While airfare is paid for up front by the government, all other costs are reimbursed, including transportation costs, hotel costs, and per diem allowance.

      For more information, to view the most recent call for applications, or to apply, visit http://teacheratsea.noaa.gov/.

      Web Site: http://teacheratsea.noaa.gov
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      The Global Education Project | Staff

      Resource type: Web Site - CD - Report - Research
      Topics: Earth - Environmental Health - Water


      The Global Education Project is a Canadian non-governmental organization with over 20 years of history in publishing fact-packed educational wall posters and producing live events to educate about important issues. The Global Education Project's previous poster on the Middle East is being used by over 200 colleges and universities in Canada, US, and internationally, as well as thousands of individuals and activist organizations.

      In 2005, the Global Education Project's production team compiled an unparalleled collection of broad-based factual information on the state of the world's environment and distilled it into a series of jaw-dropping charts, maps, and graphs, now available on the wall poster Earth: A Graphic Look at the State of the World.

      The information takes a bold look at a wide range of environmental issues-from climate change and species extinctions to debt, population, and food supply-giving a rare visual overview of the state of ecological and humanitarian conditions over the entire biosphere. It is an Executive Summary of the state of the planet.

      This web site is the result of this work. The site (and the accompanying wall chart) are here to show you - in as clear, objective, and accessible a format as possible—the condition of the world—both its natural and human elements.

      EARTH: A Graphic Look at the State of the World summarizes the conditions of the world's natural ecology and human cultures, their interactions and impact on each other.

      EARTH is published in three formats; a full color 27 x 36 wall chart, an interactive web site, and a CD (with slide show, commentary, and printouts).

      This integrated collection makes obvious the connections between apparently disparate topics core statistics on forests, soil, fresh water and ocean fisheries are side by side with the numbers on climate change, carbon dioxide emissions, wealth and power, food supply and oil supply, military budgets, population density, health, poverty, access to clean water and life expectancy.

      Use this site to view the data, check out the wall chart, order a copy, or test your knowledge with the Earth Quiz. Also, consider signing up for the Earth Dispatch—our fantastic monthly newsletter that profiles one urgently important topic each month.

      Web Site: http://www.theglobaleducationproject.org/earth/index.php
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      The Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy: a baseline survey of adult environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors | Dr. Tony Murphy

      Resource type: Report - Research - Guide
      Topics: Education - Research - Evaluation - Human Communities


      A baseline survey of adult environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors

      Minnesota residents continue to encounter a variety of environmental issues. What knowledge and skills do they need to be able to solve these issues? It is clear that Minnesota needs an environmentally literate citizenry-one that has knowledge about, and attitudes toward the environment and the issues that in turn may affect behaviors related to the environment.

      What does environmental literacy mean? People who are environmentally literate:
    • understand the complexity of natural and social systems and their interrelationships.
    • demonstrate the knowledge, skills, attitudes, motivation, and commitment to work individually and collectively toward sustaining a healthy natural and social environment.
    • have the capacity to perceive and interpret the health of environmental and social systems and take appropriate action to maintain, restore, or improve the health of those systems.


    • The Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy (2002) documents the results of the first statewide survey, which was conducted in 2001, concerning environmental literacy of adults in Minnesota. It created a baseline of environmental literacy for residents of the state. Two more report cards have been written. The Second Minnesota Report Card was published in 2004 and The Third Minnesota Report Card was published in 2008. All can be found at http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_b.cfm. Minnesota adults were surveyed for their knowledge about, attitudes toward, and behaviors related to the environment.

      In The Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy, questions on urban sprawl and fertilizer use were included along with general knowledge, attitude and behavior questions. The second report card (2004), had questions on water and in the third report card (2008) questions on energy and climate change.

      Results for this report card are compared to survey results of Pennsylvania residents and United States citizens. It is important to conduct similar surveys in the future. By continuing to collect information about Minnesotans' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, we can track trends in environmental literacy and highlight any appropriate changes to our education efforts.

      Survey Instrument

      From August through November 2001, a random sample of 1,000 Minnesota adults answered a series of questions in a telephone survey conducted by the Wilder Research Center (St. Paul, Minn.). A copy of the entire survey is available in Appendix A. See Appendix C for the final frequencies of responses to each individual question.

      The Minnesota environmental literacy survey was developed with members of the working group (see acknowledgements page of the report). The survey instrument includes questions from various National Report Cards on Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors conducted by the National Environmental Education Training Foundation and Roper Starch Worldwide. Questions were also developed specifically for this survey.

      Data Analysis

      Data from the survey interviews were analyzed using frequencies of occurrence and the Pearson Chi-Square, which tests the relationship between two variables and reports statistical significance. One set of variables in this report is the demographics (gender, age, education, location, income), while the other set is the questions from the survey.

      Demographics

      The respondents to the survey were divided according to specific demographics to allow for analysis of the data. The demographics selected were gender, age (18-34, 35-44, 45-64, and 65 and over), education (high school, some college, college degree), location (seven-county metro, other metro areas in the state, non-metro or rural areas), and income ($30,000 or less, $30,001-$50,000, $50,001-$75,000, and over $75,000). The Pearson Chi-Square determines a statistical relationship between two variables, in this case, demographics and the questions.

      Organization of the Minnesota Report Card

      The Second Report Card is divided into four parts. The first three discuss specific sections of the survey: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The final section offers an integrated perspective to the overall report and to Minnesota adults' environmental literacy.

      It is important to remember that this survey and report are not an evaluation of the public, but rather a further collection of information concerning the knowledge about, attitudes toward, and behaviors related to the environment in Minnesota. This will be used with the previous report-and future reports-to track trends and changes in environmental literacy as Minnesota adults are surveyed again at various points in the future.

      Acknowledgements

      The Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy was developed by Hamline University's Center for Global Environmental Education through a state Environmental Assistance grant. Dr. Tony Murphy, College of St. Catherine, was the principal author of the project.

      For More Information:

      To request a print copy of The Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy or The Second Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy - 2004 contact the MPCA Learning Resource Center at resourcecenter.pca@state.mn.us or 651-757-2120, 800-877-6300 toll free. All three report cards can be found online at http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_b.cfm.

      If you have questions concerning The Second Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy contact Dr. Tony Murphy at tmurphy@globe.gov, 651-690-6711.

      Web Site: http://www.seek.state.mn.us/publications/reportcard2002.pdf
      Contact Information / Display Complete Database Record


      The Natural Inquirer | Teri Heyer

      Resource type: Book/Magazine - Research
      Topics: Forests/Trees - Research - Resource Management


      The Natural Inquirer is a middle school science education journal. Scientists report their research in journals, which enable scientists to share information with one another.

      The Natural Inquirer was created so that scientists can share their research with middle school students. Each article tells you about scientific research conducted by scientists in the USDA Forest Service. First students will "meet the scientists" who conduct the research. Then students read special information about science, and then about the environment. Students will also read about a specific research project, written in a way that scientists write when publishing their research in journals.

      Students become scientists when they do the Discovery FACTivity, learning vocabulary words that help in understanding articles. At the end of each section of Natural Inquirer articles, students will find a few questions to help think about the research.
      http://www.naturalinquirer.org/


      Web Site: http://www.naturalinquirer.org
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      The Psychology of Sustainable Behavior: Tips for empowering people to take environmentally positive action | Christina Manning, Ph.D.

      Resource type: Guide - Research
      Topics: Sustainability


      There are many ways we can empower ourselves, and those around us, to live more sustainably. Psychology, the study of human behavior, offers many insights. The purpose of this handbook is to introduce you to research-based tips from psychology to help you in your personal, community, and workplace efforts to empower sustainability.

      The recommendations are based on empirical research; most of the studies described here have been published in peer-reviewed academic journals. This document represents many years of psychological studies. Psychology is a diverse field with many contributions to make. Dr. Christina Manning has summarized the studies and findings most relevant to sustainability and sustainable behavior change.

      The handbook begins with an overview of the psychology of sustainable behavior, providing a short background on this field of study. The following section then describes how the tips from psychology fit into sustainability campaigns and explains how individual sustainability contributes to broader social and policy change. There are seven separate tips and they are listed in order of importance.

      Download the document at http://www.pca.state.mn.us/enzq7b6.

      Web Site: http://www.pca.state.mn.us/enzq7b6
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      The Second Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy: a survey of adult environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors | Dr. Tony Murphy

      Resource type: Report - Research - Guide
      Topics: Education - Research - Evaluation - Water


      A survey of adult environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors

      Minnesota residents continue to encounter a variety of environmental issues. What knowledge and skills do they need to be able to solve these issues? It is clear that Minnesota needs an environmentally literate citizenry-one that has knowledge about, and attitudes toward the environment and the issues that in turn may affect behaviors related to the environment.

      What does environmental literacy mean? People who are environmentally literate:
    • understand the complexity of natural and social systems and their interrelationships.
    • demonstrate the knowledge, skills, attitudes, motivation, and commitment to work individually and collectively toward sustaining a healthy natural and social environment.
    • have the capacity to perceive and interpret the health of environmental and social systems and take appropriate action to maintain, restore, or improve the health of those systems.


    • The Second Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy (http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_b.cfm) August 2004, documents the results of the second statewide survey, which was conducted in 2003, concerning environmental literacy of adults in Minnesota. The first survey (2001)created a baseline of environmental literacy for residents of the state. And the third report card was published in 2008, with the survey conducted in 2007. All can be found at http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_b.cfm Minnesota adults were surveyed for their knowledge about, attitudes toward, and behaviors related to the environment.

      Some of the findings in the second report card include:
    • 80 percent of Minnesotans view as important a candidate's record on the environment when voting.
    • Few Minnesotans believe environmental laws have gone "too far".
    • 82 percent view loss of wetlands and residential runoff from yards as serious.
    • 90 percent want schools to provide environmental education.
    • Most Minnesotans are taking some actions to protect the environment.
    • There is a connection between increased environmental knowledge, a more positive environmental attitude, and behavior changes to protect the environment.
    • Overall Minnesotans reported that they know the most about water pollution (61 percent) and least about sustainability (20 percent) and biodiversity (14 percent).


    • The Second Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy follows a similar format to the previous report; however, it goes on to examine changes that occurred in the intervening period for questions used in both surveys. Comparisons are also made to Pennsylvania residents and United States citizens. These comparisons are based on similar studies performed by Pennsylvania and nationally. While some of the data from these surveys may seem old, they are important to include, as Pennsylvania is still the only other state to conduct a similar survey. See Pennsylvania report.

      It is important to conduct similar surveys in the future. By continuing to collect information about Minnesotans' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, we can track trends in environmental literacy and highlight any appropriate changes to our education efforts.

      Survey Instrument
      From August through November 2003, a random sample of 1,000 Minnesota adults answered a series of questions in a telephone survey conducted by the Wilder Research Center (St. Paul, Minn.). A copy of the entire survey is available in Appendix A. See Appendix C for the final frequencies of responses to each individual question.

      The Minnesota environmental literacy survey was developed with members of the working group (see acknowledgements page of the report). The survey instrument includes questions from various National Report Cards on Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors (referred to as National Environmental Report Cards in this report) conducted by the National Environmental Education Training Foundation and Roper Starch Worldwide. Questions were also developed specifically for this survey.

      Data Analysis
      Data from the survey interviews were analyzed using frequencies of occurrence and the Pearson Chi-Square, which tests the relationship between two variables and reports statistical significance. One set of variables in this report is the demographics (gender, age, education, location, income), while the other set is the questions from the survey.

      Demographics
      The respondents to the survey were divided according to specific demographics to allow for analysis of the data. The demographics selected were gender, age (18-34, 35-44, 45-64, and 65 and over), education (high school, some college, college degree), location (seven-county metro, other metro areas in the state, non-metro or rural areas), and income ($30,000 or less, $30,001-$50,000, $50,001-$75,000, and over $75,000). The Pearson Chi-Square determines a statistical relationship between two variables, in this case, demographics and the questions.

      Organization of the Second Report Card
      The Second Report Card is divided into four parts. The first three discuss specific sections of the survey: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The final section offers an integrated perspective to the overall report and to Minnesota adults' environmental literacy.

      It is important to remember that this survey and report are not an evaluation of the public, but rather a further collection of information concerning the knowledge about, attitudes toward, and behaviors related to the environment in Minnesota. This will be used with the previous report-and future reports-to track trends and changes in environmental literacy as Minnesota adults are surveyed again at various points in the future.

      Acknowledgements
      The Second Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy was developed by Hamline University's Center for Global Environmental Education through a state Environmental Assistance grant. Dr. Tony Murphy, College of St. Catherine, was the principal author of the project.

      For More Information:
      To request a printed copy of The Second Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy - 2004 or The Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy - 2002 contact the MPCA Learning Resource Center at resourcecenter.pca@state.mn.us or 651-757-2120, 800-877-6300 toll free. All three report cards can be found online at http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_b.cfm.

      If you have questions concerning The Second Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy contact Dr. Tony Murphy at tmurphy@globe.gov, 651-690-6711.

      Contact Information / Display Complete Database Record


      The Third Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy PowerPoint | Dr. Tony Murphy

      Resource type: Report - Research - Slides
      Topics: Education - Research - Evaluation - Human Communities


      This is the PowerPoint presentation on The Third Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy conducted by Dr. Tony Murphy, principal author of the three Minnesota Report Cards. It offers a summary and data from the 2008 Report Card.

      This presentation addresses the following:
    • What is important about environmental literacy?
    • Why do we need environmental literacy?
    • What is involved in environmental literacy?
    • Is there an appropriate grade level of environmental literacy necessary for Minnesotans to make informed environmental decisions?

      View the Minnesota Report Cards at http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_b.cfm.

      It can be seen and downloaded from http://www.seek.state.mn.us/publications/reportcard2008-presentation.pdf.

      Contact Information / Display Complete Database Record


      The Third Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy: a survey of adult environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors | Anthony Murphy, Ph.D. and Andrea Olson, Ph.D., of the College of St. Catherine

      Resource type: Report - Research - Guide
      Topics: Education - Research - Evaluation - Energy


      A survey of adult environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors

      Minnesota residents continue to encounter a variety of environmental issues. What knowledge and skills do they need to be able to solve these issues? It is clear that Minnesota needs an environmentally literate citizenry-one that has knowledge about, and attitudes toward the environment and the issues that in turn may affect behaviors related to the environment.

      What does environmental literacy mean? People who are environmentally literate:
    • understand the complexity of natural and social systems and their interrelationships.
    • demonstrate the knowledge, skills, attitudes, motivation, and commitment to work individually and collectively toward sustaining a healthy natural and social environment.
    • have the capacity to perceive and interpret the health of environmental and social systems and take appropriate action to maintain, restore, or improve the health of those systems.


    • The Third Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy (2008) documents the results of the third statewide survey concerning the environmental literacy of adults in Minnesota. http://www.seek.state.mn.us/publications/reportcard2008.pdf For the report cards, 1,000 Minnesota adults were surveyed by telephone for their knowledge about, attitudes toward, and behaviors related to the environment. The results of these statewide surveys have been summarized in report cards, where responses are broken down demographically and compared to related survey questions in studies performed in Minnesota, by other states, and nationally.

      In The Third Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy questions on energy and climate change were included along with general knowledge, attitude and behavior questions. The first report card (2002) included questions on urban sprawl and in the second report card (2004), questions on water. http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_b.cfm

      Some of the findings in the third report card include:
    • 93 percent of Minnesotans support environmental education in schools.
    • 85 percent participate in recycling programs.
    • 67 percent believe that renewable energy is the best means to meet America's energy needs.
    • 41 percent of Minnesotans reported that they frequently purchase locally grown food.
    • time spent outdoors in a non-work capacity ranged from 12 percent reporting five or fewer hours per week outdoors to 7.4 percent reporting more than 40 hours per week outdoors.


    • It is important to conduct similar surveys in the future. By continuing to collect information about Minnesotans' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, we can track trends in environmental literacy and highlight any appropriate changes to our education efforts.

      Survey Instrument
      From August through November 2007, a random sample of 1,000 Minnesota adults answered a series of questions in a telephone survey conducted by Marketline Research. A copy of the entire survey is available in Appendix A. See Appendix C for the final frequencies of responses to each individual question.

      The Minnesota environmental literacy survey was developed with members of the working group (see acknowledgements page of the report). The survey instrument includes questions from various National Report Cards on Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors (referred to as National Environmental Report Cards in this report) conducted by the National Environmental Education Training Foundation and Roper Starch Worldwide, previous Minnesota report cards and other surveys. Questions were also developed specifically for this survey.

      Data Analysis
      Data from the survey interviews were analyzed using frequencies of occurrence and the Pearson Chi-Square, which tests the relationship between two variables and reports statistical significance. One set of variables in this report is the demographics (gender, age, education, location, income), while the other set is the questions from the survey.

      Demographics
      The respondents to the survey were divided according to specific demographics to allow for analysis of the data. The demographics selected were gender, age (18-34, 35-44, 45-64, and 65 and over), education (high school, some college, college degree), location (seven-county metro, other metro areas in the state, non-metro or rural areas), and income ($30,000 or less, $30,001-$50,000, $50,001-$75,000, and over $75,000). The Pearson Chi-Square determines a statistical relationship between two variables, in this case, demographics and the questions.

      Organization of the Third Report Card
      The Third Report Card is divided into four parts. The first three discuss specific sections of the survey: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The final section offers an integrated perspective to the overall report and environmental literacy research.

      It is important to remember that this survey and report are not an evaluation of the public, but rather a further collection of information concerning the knowledge about, attitudes toward, and behaviors related to the environment in Minnesota. This will be used with the previous report-and future reports-to track trends and changes in environmental literacy as Minnesota adults are surveyed again at various points in the future.

      Acknowledgements
      The Third Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy was written by written by Anthony Murphy, Ph.D. and Andrea Olson, Ph.D., of the College of St. Catherine, with funding from the MN Pollution Control Agency.

      For More Information
      To read and/or download The Third Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy go to http://www.seek.state.mn.us/eemn_b.cfm.

      If you have questions concerning The Third Minnesota Report Card on Environmental Literacy contact Dr. Tony Murphy at tmurphy@globe.gov, 651-690-6711.

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      U of M Bee Lab | University of Minnesota Extension Service

      Resource type: Web Site - Research - Course/Workshop - Guide
      Topics: Animals


      All about bees! The Bee Lab at the University of Minnesota Extension Service is the place to go for schools or educators interested in a project with bees. Resources offered include beekeeping manuals, videos, bumble bee rearing guides, posters and more. There are also educational opportunities offered which include courses for the public as well as academic and online courses.

      We also conduct research projects. The goal of our research projects is to promote the health of bee pollinators. Our primary research focus is on honey bees, ranging from basic studies on mechanisms of social behaviors to applied studies on bee breeding and management. We work as a team to provide the richest learning environment for students at all levels and from all backgrounds.

      Web Site: http://www.extension.umn.edu/honeybees
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      UMD Center for Environmental Education | Julie Ernst and Ken Gilbertson

      Resource type: Higher Education - EE Site - Research - Web Site
      Topics: Education - Sustainability - Curriculum - Research


      The Center for Environmental Education is dedicated to facilitating leadership and educational experiences that foster environmental sustainability through outdoor and environmental education. We value an integrated approach to environmental sustainability, as well as an experiential-based approach to engaging students in the environmental challenges of our local, regional, and international communities. We aim for excellence in outdoor and environmental education, leadership, and scholarship.

      Our vision is to be a leader in education for sustainability by serving as a catalyst for collaboration among campus departments and community organizations, sponsoring educational opportunities, facilitating outreach and civic engagement opportunities with off-campus organizations and agencies, and encouraging research activities that support the goals of environmental sustainability.

      Web Site: http://www.d.umn.edu/ceed/
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      Watersheds-Mapping | Pelican River Watershed District

      Resource type: Guide - Research - Resource Person - Speaker
      Topics: Environmental Studies - Lake - Pollution - Water


      Students will be able to:
      -Read a map of a watershed and contour maps of areas lakes
      -Read topography
      -Differentiate maps that show vegetation (forest vs. farmland)

      They will understand:
      -How H2O gets into our watershed
      -How the affects of runoff lends to poor water quality by using a map of point vs non-point sources
      -Human impact on water quality
      -Changing landforms over time
      Contact: Pelican River Watershed District (218)846-0436

      **********

      ENVIRONMENTAL LITERACY SCOPE AND SEQUENCE
      SYSTEM CONCEPT(S) TO BE ADDRESSED:
      Abiotic factors
      Accumulation
      Cause and effect
      Probability

      SYSTEM BENCHMARK(S) TO BE ADDRESSED FOR GRADES 6-8
      C-3 Social and natural systems are connected to each other and to other larger or smaller systems.

      FOR GRADES 9-12 (adult)
      D-2 Interaction between social and natural systems is defined by their boundaries, relation to other systems, and expected inputs and outputs.

      **********

      MINNESOTA ACADEMIC STANDARDS
      MINNESOTA SCIENCE STANDARD(S) TO BE ADDRESSED:
      7.IV.C.3 - The student will define an ecosystem as all populations living together and the physical factors with which they interact.

      7.IV.C.4 - The student will explain the factors that affect the number and types of organisms an ecosystem can support, including available resources, abiotic and biotic factors and disease.

      8.I.B.2 - The student will describe how scientists can conduct investigations in a simple system and make generalizations to more complex systems.

      8.I.D.2 - The student will cite examples of how science and technology contributed to changes in agriculture, manufacturing, sanitation, medicine, warfare, transportation, information processing or communication.

      9-12.I.B.6 - The student will give examples of how different domains of science use different bodies of scientific knowledge and employ different methods to investigate questions.

      9-12.I.C.4 - The student will know that technological changes and scientific advances are often accompanied by social, political, environmental and economic changes.

      **********
      NI7
      NI8
      NI9
      Posted by Natural Innovations


      Web Site: http://www.prwd.org
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